Variation in the oral processing of everyday meals is associated with fullness and meal size; a potential nudge to reduce energy intake

Raw data for the paper entitled "Variation in the oral processing of everyday meals is associated with fullness and meal size; a potential nudge to reduce energy intake". Abstract: Laboratory studies have demonstrated that experimental manipulations of oral processing can have a marked effect on energy intake. Here, we explored whether variations in oral processing across a range of unmodified everyday meals could affect post-meal fullness and meal size. In Study 1, female participants (N=12) attended the laboratory over 20 lunchtime sessions to consume a 400-kcal portion of a different commercially available pre-packaged meal. Prior to consumption, expected satiation was assessed. During each meal, oral processing was characterised using; i) video-recordings of the mouth and ii) real-time measures of plate weight. Hunger and fullness ratings were elicited pre- and post-consumption, and for a further three hours. Foods that were eaten slowly had higher expected satiation and delivered more satiation and satiety. Building on these findings, in Study 2 we selected two meals (identical energy density) from Study 1 that were equally liked but maximised differences in oral processing. On separate days, male and female participants (N=24) consumed a 400-kcal portion of either the ‘fast’ or ‘slow’ meal followed by an ad libitum meal (either the same food or a dessert). When continuing with the same food, participants consumed less of the slow meal. Further, differences in food intake during the ad libitum meal were not compensated at a subsequent snacking opportunity an hour later. Together, these findings suggest that variations in oral processing across a range of unmodified everyday meals can affect fullness after consuming a fixed portion and can also impact meal size. Modifying food form to encourage increased oral processing (albeit to a lesser extent than in experimental manipulations) might represent a viable target for food manufacturers to help to nudge consumers to manage their weight.

Creator(s) Bosworth, ML
Funder This research was supported by a grant (Grant number: BB/J005622/1) awarded to JMB (PI) and PJR (Co-I) from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (United Kingdom - http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/home/home.aspx) and by Nestlé Research Centre (Switzerland - http://www.research.nestle.com/). The Nutrition and Behaviour Unit (University of Bristol) also receives support from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007–2013 - http://cordis.europa.eu/fp7/home_en.html) under Grant Agreement 607310 (Nudge-it - http://www.nudge-it.eu/).
Contributor(s) ["Matthew Bosworth", "Bosworth, ML"], Brunstrom, JM, Mercer Moss, FJ, Forde, CG, Van Den Heuvel, E, Rogers, PJ, Appleton, SL, Ferriday, D, Godinot, N, Martin, N
Publication date 08 Apr 2015
Language eng
Publisher University of Bristol
Licence Non-Commercial Government License for public sector information
DOI 10.5523/bris.1ixo0ch6xpc2k115dkl5ph8v78
Complete download (zip) http://data.bris.ac.uk/datasets/1ixo0ch6xpc2k115dkl5ph8v78/1ixo0ch6xpc2k115dkl5ph8v78.zip
Citation Bosworth, ML (2015): Variation in the oral processing of everyday meals is associated with fullness and meal size; a potential nudge to reduce energy intake. https://doi.org/10.5523/bris.1ixo0ch6xpc2k115dkl5ph8v78
Total size 210.1 KiB

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